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dc.contributor.authorDuring Filho, Frederico Adolfopt_BR
dc.contributor.authorBeluco, Alexandrept_BR
dc.contributor.authorRossini, Elton Gimenezpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorSouza, José dept_BR
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-11T02:36:46Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2018pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn2168-1562pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/183269pt_BR
dc.description.abstractThe notion of energetic complementarity can be a tool for energy resource managers to prioritize energy generation projects based on renewable resources in both interconnected and independent systems. As a tool in decision- making, it is important to know better the influence of energetic complementarity on the performance of hybrid systems especially with regard to energy shortages but also in relation to other parameters. In recent years, hydro PV hybrid systems have become a growing target of researchers and designers for the idea of installing photovoltaic modules on the water surface of reservoirs. Energetic complementarity has three components: time-complementarity, energy-amplitude and amplitude-complementarity. This paper is dedicated to the study of the influence of time-complementarity on the storage of energy through batteries in hydro PV hybrid systems. The method applied is in the literature and suggests the simulation of the system under study with the idealization of energy availabilities, to remove the effects of climatic variations and the characteristic intermittency of renewable resources. Simulations were performed with the well-known software Homer. The results provided the variations of the states of charge of the batteries as a function of different time-complementarities, indicating as expected better performances associated to higher time-complementarities The results indicated that the cost of energy for a hybrid system with 28 batteries was equal to US$ 0.502 per kWh and that this cost increased as the time complementarity between energy resources moved away from the situation corresponding to full complementarity. The simulations also showed that the maintenance of the zero failure condition supplying the demands of the consumer loads requires that the load be reduced to 52% if the complementarity is reduced from the full complementarity to zero complementarity, with the cost of energy going from US$ 0.502 per kWh to US$ 0.796 per kWh. The results also allow a better understanding of the influence of time complementarity on the performance of hybrid systems.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofComputational Water, Energy, and Environmental Engineering. Delaware. Vol. 7, no. 3 (2018), 18 p.pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectComplementaridade energéticapt_BR
dc.subjectEnergetic complementarityen
dc.subjectTime complementarityen
dc.subjectSistema híbrido de energiapt_BR
dc.subjectEnergia solar fotovoltaicapt_BR
dc.subjectHybrid systemsen
dc.subjectRecursos energéticospt_BR
dc.subjectHydro poweren
dc.subjectPV poweren
dc.subjectHidrelétricaspt_BR
dc.subjectHydro PV hybrid systemsen
dc.subjectBateriaspt_BR
dc.titleInfluence of time complementarity on energy storage through batteries in hydro PV hybrid energy systempt_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001078397pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


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