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dc.contributor.advisorPiccinini, Cesar Augustopt_BR
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Beatrizpt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-30T02:34:13Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2018pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/165921pt_BR
dc.description.abstractCoparenting emerges across the transition to parenthood and refers to the way individuals coordinate, support each other in their parental roles and share responsibility in childrearing. Despite the increase in research on coparenting, relatively few studies have focused on non- North American or non-European families, which has hindered practice and policy targeting diverse countries. Likewise, qualitative research on coparenting is relatively rare, yet critical to shed light on details and complexities not well captured by other methods, including insights into sociocultural factors linked to coparenting in distinct contexts. Moreover, a qualitative longitudinal approach is particularly well suited to examine important life course transitions and turning points, such as the transition to parenthood. To address these gaps, we investigated coparenting across the transition to parenthood in South-Brazilian families, using a qualitative, longitudinal, multiple case study. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 12 first-time mother and fathers (six nuclear families altogether), at 6, 12, and 18 months postpartum (36 interviews altogether). In two families only the father was employed, with the mother caring for the child; in two families both parents were employed, and they hired a nanny to care for the child in their home; and, in two families both parents were employed, and the child started attending daycare at the end of maternity leave. Through the two articles that comprise the current doctoral dissertation, we explored three components of Feinberg’s (2003) coparenting framework: division of labor (how parents divide childcare tasks and household chores, as well as their satisfaction with this division); agreement/disagreement (e.g., regarding children’s emotional needs and discipline); and, support/undermining (appreciation and cooperation, or criticism and competition). The first article is focused on the division of labor, whereas the second is focused on agreement/disagreement and support/undermining. Deductive thematic analysis revealed similarities and singularities between families. As presented in the first article, we found weaker sharing of household chores over time, against greater sharing of childcare tasks during the first few days postpartum, followed by a downward tendency in the fathers’ contributions during the first few months postpartum. This more unequal division of labor remained stable over time only for families who had chosen maternal care, changing after the end of maternity leave for families who had chosen nanny care and daycare. Parental satisfaction regarding the division of labor remained relatively high over time only for families who had chosen nanny care, which suggests that counting on a domestic worker since the beginning of the transition to parenthood contributed to preventing parental feelings of overload or unfairness across the transition to parenthood. Findings were discussed in the 10 light of the role that instrumental and social support, as well as the prevailing Brazilian gender norms, may play in the division of labor for new parents. With respect to the second article, our findings showed that agreement among parents remained relatively stable during the first year, whereas disagreements concerning discipline demanded more parental negotiation as infants advanced toward toddlerhood. Support and undermining coexisted in the same families, although mothers and fathers expressed undermining differently. Aspects of the ecological context, such as family of origin, instrumental and social support, as well as labor market, also appeared to influence coparenting agreement/disagreement and support/ undermining. Following each article, we presented strengths, limitations, suggestions for future research, as well as implications for practice (e.g., counseling) and policy (e.g., childcare arrangements and parental leave).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoporpt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectParentalidadept_BR
dc.subjectCoparentingen
dc.subjectFamily relationsen
dc.subjectCoparentalidadept_BR
dc.subjectRelações familiarespt_BR
dc.subjectTransition to parenthooden
dc.subjectRelações pais-criançapt_BR
dc.titleCoparenting across the transition to parenthood : qualitative evidence from South-Brazilian familiespt_BR
dc.typeTesept_BR
dc.contributor.advisor-coFrizzo, Giana Bitencourtpt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001046077pt_BR
dc.degree.grantorUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sulpt_BR
dc.degree.departmentInstituto de Psicologiapt_BR
dc.degree.programPrograma de Pós-Graduação em Psicologiapt_BR
dc.degree.localPorto Alegre, BR-RSpt_BR
dc.degree.date2018pt_BR
dc.degree.leveldoutoradopt_BR


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