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dc.contributor.authorVieira, Laura Limapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Amanda Vilaverdept_BR
dc.contributor.authorMachado, Monique de Mourapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorKayser, Michele Luzpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorVettori, Daniela Vanessapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorAlegretti, Ana Paulapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Charles Franciscopt_BR
dc.contributor.authorVettorazzi, Janetept_BR
dc.contributor.authorValério, Edimárlei Gonsalespt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T04:22:13Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2019pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1471-2393pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/205809pt_BR
dc.description.abstractBackground: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is one of the most important causative agents of neonatal sepsis. As administration of prophylactic antibiotics during labor can prevent GBS infection, routine screening for this bacterium in prenatal care before the onset of labor is recommended. However, many women present in labor without having undergone such testing during antenatal care, and the turnaround time of detection methods is insufficient for results to be obtained before delivery. Methods: Vaginal and anorectal specimens were collected from 270 pregnant women. Each sample was tested by Xpert GBS, qPCR, and culture for GBS detection. Results: The overall prevalence of maternal GBS colonization was 30.7% according to Xpert GBS, 51.1% according to qPCR, and 14.3% according to cultures. Considering the qPCR method as the reference, the Xpert GBS had a sensitivity of 53% and specificity of 93%. Positive Xpert GBS results were correlated to marital status (married or cohabitating) and with prematurity as a cause of neonatal hospitalization. Positive cultures were related with ischemic–hypoxic encephalopathy requiring therapeutic hypothermia. Conclusions: Combined enrichment/qPCR and the Xpert GBS rapid test found a high prevalence of GBS colonization. The Xpert GBS technique gives faster results and could be useful for evaluating mothers who present without antenatal GBS screening results and are at risk of preterm labor, thus allowing institution of prophylactic antibiotic therapy.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. London. Vol. 19 (2019), 532, 8 p.pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectGroup B Streptococcusen
dc.subjectStreptococcus agalactiaept_BR
dc.subjectXpert GBSen
dc.subjectCuidado pré-natalpt_BR
dc.subjectReal-time polymerase chain reactionen
dc.subjectInfecções estreptocócicaspt_BR
dc.subjectAntenatal careen
dc.subjectDiagnósticopt_BR
dc.subjectGravidezpt_BR
dc.subjectMulherespt_BR
dc.titleGroup B Streptococcus detection in pregnant women : comparison of qPCR assay, culture, and the Xpert GBS rapid testpt_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001110102pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


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