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dc.contributor.authorVieira, Bruna Angelopt_BR
dc.contributor.authorLuft, Vivian Cristinept_BR
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Maria Inêspt_BR
dc.contributor.authorChambless, Lloyd Ellwoodpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorChor, Dorapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorBarreto, Sandhi Mariapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Bruce Bartholowpt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-01T02:36:51Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2016pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/158965pt_BR
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rising worldwide. Its association with alcohol intake, a major lifestyle factor, is unclear, particularly with respect to the influence of drinking with as opposed to outside of meals.We investigated the associations of different aspects of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components. In cross-sectional analyses of 14,375 active or retired civil servants (aged 35–74 years) participating in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil),we fitted logistic regression models to investigate interactions between the quantity of alcohol, the timing of its consumption with respect to meals, and the predominant beverage type in the association of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, educational level, income, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, light consumption of alcoholic beverages with meals was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome ( 4 drinks/week:OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.74–0.97; 4 to 7 drinks/week:OR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.61–0.92), compared to abstention/occasional drinking. On the other hand, greater consumption of alcohol consumed outside of meals was significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (7 to 14 drinks/week:OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.11–1.57; 14 drinks/week:OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.29–1.98). Drinking predominantly wine, which occurred mostly with meals, was significantly related to a lower syndrome prevalence; drinking predominantly beer, most notably when outside of meals and in larger quantity, was frequently associated with a greater prevalence In conclusion, the alcohol— metabolic syndrome association differs markedly depending on the relationship of intake to meals. Beverage preference—wine or beer—appears to underlie at least part of this difference. Notably, most alcohol was consumed in metabolically unfavorable type and timing. If further investigations extend these findings to clinically relevant endpoints, public policies should recommend that alcohol, when taken, should be preferably consumed with meals.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE. San Francisco. Vol. 11, no. 9 (Sep. 2016), e0163044, 17 p.pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectConsumo de bebidas alcoolicaspt_BR
dc.subjectSíndrome X metabólicapt_BR
dc.titleTiming and type of alcohol consumption and the metabolic syndrome: ELSA-Brasilpt_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001013860pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


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