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dc.contributor.authorGong, Tingtingpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorJaratlerdsiri, Weerachaipt_BR
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Juept_BR
dc.contributor.authorWillet, Calipt_BR
dc.contributor.authorChew, Tracypt_BR
dc.contributor.authorPatrick, Sean M.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Ruth J.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorHaynes, Anne-Mareept_BR
dc.contributor.authorPasqualim, Gabrielapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorBrum, Ilma Simonipt_BR
dc.contributor.authorStricker, Phillip D.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorMutambirwa, Shingai B. A.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorSadsad, Rosemariept_BR
dc.contributor.authorPapenfuss, Anthony T.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorBornman, Riana M. S.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorChan, Eva K. F.pt_BR
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Vanessa M.pt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-07T05:02:02Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2022pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn1756-994Xpt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/254225pt_BR
dc.description.abstractBackground: African ancestry is a signifcant risk factor for advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Mortality rates in subSaharan Africa are 2.5-fold greater than global averages. However, the region has largely been excluded from the benefts of whole genome interrogation studies. Additionally, while structural variation (SV) is highly prevalent, PCa genomic studies are still biased towards small variant interrogation. Methods: Using whole genome sequencing and best practice workfows, we performed a comprehensive analysis of SVs for 180 (predominantly Gleason score ≥ 8) prostate tumours derived from 115 African, 61 European and four ancestrally admixed patients. We investigated the landscape and relationship of somatic SVs in driving ethnic disparity (African versus European), with a focus on African men from southern Africa. Results: Duplication events showed the greatest ethnic disparity, with a 1.6- (relative frequency) to 2.5-fold (count) increase in African-derived tumours. Furthermore, we found duplication events to be associated with CDK12 inac‑ tivation and MYC copy number gain, and deletion events associated with SPOP mutation. Overall, African-derived tumours were 2-fold more likely to present with a hyper-SV subtype. In addition to hyper-duplication and deletion subtypes, we describe a new hyper-translocation subtype. While we confrm a lower TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive rate in tumours from African cases (10% versus 33%), novel African-specifc PCa ETS family member and TMPRSS2 fusion partners were identifed, including LINC01525, FBXO7, GTF3C2, NTNG1 and YPEL5. Notably, we found 74 somatic SV hotspots impacting 18 new candidate driver genes, with CADM2, LSAMP, PTPRD, PDE4D and PACRG having therapeutic implications for African patients. Conclusions: In this frst African-inclusive SV study for high-risk PCa, we demonstrate the power of SV interrogation for the identifcation of novel subtypes, oncogenic drivers and therapeutic targets. Identifying a novel spectrum of SVs in tumours derived from African patients provides a mechanism that may contribute, at least in part, to the observed ethnic disparity in advanced PCa presentation in men of African ancestry.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofGenome medicine. United Kingdom. Vol. 14 (Aug. 2022), 100, 14 p.pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectNeoplasias da próstatapt_BR
dc.subjectChromosomal instabilityen
dc.subjectProstate canceren
dc.subjectSequenciamento completo do genomapt_BR
dc.subjectAfrican ancestryen
dc.subjectInstabilidade cromossômicapt_BR
dc.subjectAdvanced diseaseen
dc.subjectMutaçãopt_BR
dc.subjectEthnic disparityen
dc.subjectWhole genome sequencingen
dc.titleGenome-wide interrogation of structural variation reveals novel African-specifc prostate cancer oncogenic driverspt_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001157575pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


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