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dc.contributor.authorGuizzo, Melina Garciapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorNeupane, Saraswotipt_BR
dc.contributor.authorKucera, Matejpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorPerner, Janpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorFrantová, Helenapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorVaz Junior, Itabajara da Silvapt_BR
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Pedro Lagerblad dept_BR
dc.contributor.authorKopacek, Petrpt_BR
dc.contributor.authorZurek, Ludekpt_BR
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-18T03:48:29Zpt_BR
dc.date.issued2020pt_BR
dc.identifier.issn2235-2988pt_BR
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10183/212098pt_BR
dc.description.abstractCulture-independent metagenomic methodologies have enabled detection and identification of microorganisms in various biological systems and often revealed complex and unknown microbiomes. In many organisms, the microbiome outnumbers the host cells and greatly affects the host biology and fitness. Ticks are hematophagous ectoparasites with a wide host range. They vector a number of human and animal pathogens and also directly cause major economic losses in livestock. Although several reports on a tick midgut microbiota show a diverse bacterial community, in most cases the size of the bacterial population has not been determined. In this study, the microbiome was quantified in the midgut and ovaries of the ticks Ixodes ricinus and Rhipicephalus microplus before, during, and after blood feeding. Although the size of bacterial community in the midgut fluctuated with blood feeding, it was overall extremely low in comparison to that of other hematophagous arthropods. In addition, the tick ovarian microbiome of both tick species exceeded the midgut 16S rDNA copy numbers by several orders of magnitude. This indicates that the ratio of a tick midgut/ovary microbiome represents an exception to the general biology of other metazoans. In addition to the very low abundance, the tick midgut diversity in I. ricinus was variable and that is in contrast to that found in the tick ovary. The ovary of I. ricinus had a very low bacterial diversity and a very high and stable bacterial abundance with the dominant endosymbiont, Midichloria sp. The elucidation of this aspect of tick biology highlights a unique tissue-specific microbial-invertebrate host interaction.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfpt_BR
dc.language.isoengpt_BR
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology. Lausanne. Vol. 10 (May 2020), 211, 10 p.pt_BR
dc.rightsOpen Accessen
dc.subjectIxodes ricinuspt_BR
dc.subjectTicken
dc.subjectRhipicephalus micropluspt_BR
dc.subjectIxodes ricinusen
dc.subjectRhipicephalus microplusen
dc.subjectMicrobiotapt_BR
dc.subjectMidgut microbiomeen
dc.subjectIntestinopt_BR
dc.subjectOváriopt_BR
dc.subjectOvary microbiomeen
dc.subjectCoxiellapt_BR
dc.subjectSymbiosisen
dc.subjectMidichloria mitochondriipt_BR
dc.subjectAnálise de sequênciapt_BR
dc.titlePoor unstable midgut microbiome of hard ticks contrasts with abundant and stable monospecific microbiome in ovariespt_BR
dc.typeArtigo de periódicopt_BR
dc.identifier.nrb001114775pt_BR
dc.type.originEstrangeiropt_BR


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